Paul C. Vogel


Director Of Photography

Biography

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Riot on Sunset Strip (1967)
Director of Photography
Return of the Seven (1966)
Director of Photography
Hold On! (1966)
Director of Photography
The Money Trap (1966)
Director of Photography
The Rounders (1965)
Director of Photography
Signpost to Murder (1965)
Director of Photography
When the Boys Meet the Girls (1965)
Director of Photography
Village of the Giants (1965)
Director of Photography
Mail Order Bride (1964)
Director of Photography
Drums of Africa (1963)
Director of Photography
The Gun Hawk (1963)
Director of Photography
The Magic Sword (1962)
Director of Photography
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (1962)
Director of Photography
Period of Adjustment (1962)
Director of Photography
The Time Machine (1960)
Director of Photography
The Gazebo (1960)
Director of Photography
Tarzan, the Ape Man (1959)
Director of Photography
The Barbarian and the Geisha (1958)
Camera
Public Pigeon No. 1 (1957)
Director of Photography
The Wings of Eagles (1957)
Director of Photography
Bernardine (1957)
Director of Photography
The Rack (1956)
Director of Photography
High Society (1956)
Director of Photography
Jupiter's Darling (1955)
Director of Photography
The Scarlet Coat (1955)
Director of Photography
It's a Dog's Life (1955)
Director of Photography
Interrupted Melody (1955)
Director of Photography
The Tender Trap (1955)
Director of Photography
Green Fire (1955)
Director of Photography
The Student Prince (1954)
Director of Photography
Rose Marie (1954)
Director of Photography
Arena (1953)
Director of Photography
Rogue's March (1953)
Director of Photography
The Clown (1953)
Director of Photography
The Girl Who Had Everything (1953)
Director of Photography
Half a Hero (1953)
Director of Photography
The Sellout (1952)
Director of Photography
The Girl in White (1952)
Director of Photography
You For Me (1952)
Director of Photography
Holiday for Sinners (1952)
Director of Photography
The Tall Target (1951)
Director of Photography
Go for Broke! (1951)
Director of Photography
Angels in the Outfield (1951)
Director of Photography
Watch the Birdie (1951)
Director of Photography
Three Guys Named Mike (1951)
Director of Photography
The Happy Years (1950)
Director of Photography
A Lady Without Passport (1950)
Director of Photography
Dial 1119 (1950)
Director of Photography
Black Hand (1950)
Director of Photography
Battleground (1949)
Director of Photography
Scene of the Crime (1949)
Director of Photography
High Wall (1948)
Director of Photography
Merton of the Movies (1947)
Director of Photography
Lady in the Lake (1947)
Director of Photography
The Yearling (1947)
Director of Photographer for screen tests, 1942
The Negro Soldier (1944)
Camera
Pilot #5 (1943)
Director of Photography
Pacific Rendezvous (1942)
Director of Photography
Tish (1942)
Director of Photography
Sunday Punch (1942)
Director of Photography
Kid Glove Killer (1942)
Director of Photography
Journey for Margaret (1942)
Photography
Down in San Diego (1941)
Director of Photography
They All Come Out (1939)
Photography
Wide Open Faces (1938)
Photography
Everybody's Doing It (1938)
Photography
Fit for a King (1937)
Photography
The Great Lover (1931)
2nd Camera
Running Wild (1927)
Director of Photography
The Potters (1927)
Director of Photography

Cinematography (Special)

Campaigning For the Presidency (1992)
Camera

Director (Short)

Army Champions (1941)
Director

Cinematography (Short)

Capriccio Italien (1953)
Cinematographer
Souvenirs of Death (1948)
Cinematographer
Just Suppose (1948)
Director Of Photography
Martin Block's Musical Merry-Go-Round #3 (1948)
Cinematographer
The Fabulous Fraud (1948)
Cinematographer
The Amazing Mr. Nordill (1947)
Cinematographer
First Aid (1943)
Cinematographer
The Greatest Gift (1942)
Cinematographer
The Greatest Gift (1942)
Director Of Photography
Cuban Rhythm (1941)
Cinematographer
Fancy Answers (1941)
Director Of Photography
Army Champions (1941)
Cinematographer
The New Pupil (1940)
Cinematographer
Know Your Money (1940)
Cinematographer
Soak the Old (1940)
Cinematographer
A Way in the Wilderness (1940)
Cinematographer
The Big Premiere (1940)
Cinematographer
Trifles of Importance (1940)
Cinematographer
You, the People (1940)
Cinematographer
The Domineering Male (1940)
Cinematographer
Rhumba Rhythm at the Hollywood La Conga (1939)
Cinematographer
A Failure at Fifty (1939)
Cinematographer
Somewhat Secret (1939)
Cinematographer
The Ash Can Fleet (1939)
Cinematographer
Drunk Driving (1939)
Cinematographer
Money to Loan (1939)
Cinematographer
The Story of Alfred Nobel (1939)
Cinematographer
Nostradamus (1938)
Cinematographer
MEN OF STEEL (1938)
Cinematographer
The Man on the Rock (1938)
Cinematographer
The Face Behind the Mask (1938)
Cinematographer
No Place Like Rome (1936)
Cinematographer (Uncredited)

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Time Machine, The (1960) -- No Paradise Having crash landed the machine upon making the big leap to the year 802701, George (Rod Taylor) explores what appears to be unpopulated living space, where much will transpire, in George Pal's The Time Machine, 1960.
It's A Dog's Life (1955) -- Dog Eat Dog On The Waterfront Humans quite irrelevant in the opening, apart from the narration by Vic Morrow, the inner-monologue of the the Bull Terrier who will be named Wildfire (MGM used two visually identical dogs for the shoot), in It’s A Dog’s Life, 1955, from a story by the trendsetting journalist and Theodore Roosevelt supporter Richard Harding Davis.
It's A Dog's Life (1955) -- The Original Dog Lottery First business with people involved, Vic Morrow narrates as the so-far nameless bull terrier on the Bowery ca. 1900, entering the bar where Corbin (J.M. Kerrigan) presides and Patch McGill (Jeff Richards) is a gung-ho customer, in MGM’s It’s A Dog’s Life, 1955.
It's A Dog's Life (1955) -- Well Deserving Of Your Support Owner Patch (Jeff Richards) brings “Wildfire” to his first fight in turn-of-the-century New York, Vic Morrow continuing his narration in the dog’s voice, as we discover MGM’s approach to shooting the action, and meet philosophical Jeremiah (Edmund Gwenn), in It’s A Dog’s Life, 1955.
Rack, The (1956) -- Traitor We don’t know what’s up with just-returned Korean War POW Ed (Paul Newman), except that he’s afraid of his family, and doesn’t want to leave the hospital, as he takes in the entertainment (Debbie Reynolds in MGM’s The Affairs Of Dobie Gillis), and fellow patient Lee Marvin gives us a clue, in MGM’s The Rack, 1956.
Rack, The (1956) -- He Made A Strategic Withdrawal Now in a San Francisco hotel after a big fight with his career-military father, who found out he’s being court-martialed for cooperating with the enemy, just-returned Korean War POW Ed (Paul Newman), who considers himself guilty, gets a first visit from his defense attorney, Edmond O’Brien, in MGM’s The Rack, 1956.
Rack, The (1956) -- I Didn't Want You To See Me Like This First direct meeting between Anne Francis as widowed sister-in-law Aggie, Walter Pidgeon as career-military dad Col. Hall Sr. and Paul Newman as Korean War POW Capt. Hall, on the day of his return to California, so traumatized he forgets his brother was Killed In Action, in The Rack, 1956, from a Rod Serling teleplay.
Rack, The (1956) -- Where Are Your Ribbons? Reluctant JAG prosecutor (Wendell Corey as Maj. Moulton) conducts his first conference with his defendant, Paul Newman as highly decorated returning Korean War POW Capt. Hall, charged with collaborating with the enemy, his guilt or innocence not yet revealed, shooting on location at The Presidio, in MGM’s The Rack, 1956.
Rack, The (1956) -- He Was Killed Over There Opening, with Walter Pidgeon and Anne Francis, not long after they appeared as father and daughter in Forbidden Planet, also for MGM, they’re war-widow and father-in-law, not quite greeting POW Paul Newman, returning from Korea, in The Rack, 1956, from a Rod Serling teleplay.
Lady In The Lake (1947) -- Imagine You Needing Ice Cubes! Audrey Totter (as editor "Adrienne Fromset") is the subject of director-star Robert Montgomery's camera, who, as Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe, appears in a mirror, in this early scene from Lady In The Lake, 1947.
Lady In The Lake (1947) -- My Name Is Marlowe Director and star Robert Montgomery in his introduction of himself, as Raymond Chandler's detective, and "you," as the first-hand viewer, beginning the subjective-camera feature Lady In The Lake, 1947.
Lady In The Lake (1947) -- You Like Our Jail? Director-star Robert Montgomery, in his subjective-camera experiment, playing Raymond Chandler's "Philip Marlowe," sees Lloyd Nolan ("Lt. DeGarmot") and Capt. Kane (Tom Tully) in The Lady In The Lake, 1947.

Trailer

Family

Joseph R Vogel
Brother
Industry executive.

Bibliography